Clay Shirky




"The internet isn't a decoration on comtemporty society, it's a challange to it"

Clay Shirky is an american writer, teacher and consultant on social media and new technology. His work addresses many things, predominantly focusing on the social and economic effects of the internet, as well as internet technologies such as peer to peer, wireless networks and open source. He has written books pertaining to the internet and technologies effect on society. He has done many interviews on an abundance of different topics, relating to the internet. Shirky is of the belief that with new technologies enabling communication, society must take advantage of "spare brainpower" in order to develop and flourish. His recent works, "Here comes everybody" and "Cognitive surplus" focus on his admiration of online collaboration and crowd-sourcing, outsourcing tasks to the online community, and that individualized structuring is limiting progression in the work place. He states that in this contemporary society that their is a new era of people willing to produce and share, just as much as they want to consume, the reasoning being that new technology has changed the way that we participate online. He advocates the believe that participation with online collaboration will enrich society.

Shirky has an insightful view and good grasp on how the internet, with emphasis to how social media is developing society. Shirky's vast academic background shows in all of his writings and his power lies in the ease that he articulates his views, he is also credited as being one of best thinkers and advocates the net has. He is has a large archieve of internet writings which can be viewed on his website.

In the book, The Long Tail, author Chris Anderson calls Shirky "a prominent thinker on the social and economic effects of Internet technologies."

Refererences:
Clay Shirky: Social media theorist: http://www.ted.com/speakers/clay_shirky.html. Last accessed 13th Nov 2010.
wiki. (). Clay Shirky. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clay_Shirky. Last accessed 12th Nov 2010.