Matt Mason is a piracy theorist and author of The Pirates Dilemma, a best selling book on modern piracy & intellectual property. He believes that industries have benefited from pirates through the innovations they provide.
His most used example of pirates changing industry for the better would be the music industry. Speaking about Edison’s phonograph

“Musicians branded him a pirate, out to steal their work and destroy the live music business. A system was worked out where everyone could be paid royalties, which we today call the record industry”.

A more recent example of pirates changing the music industry

“When people began distributing mp3’s and changed the way the music industry does business once again they created a better distribution system. iTunes made the first major step towards legitimising this business model cos Steve Jobs understood that the only way to stop piracy is to compete with it. Pirates understood first that there was a better way to share and consume music”.

He believes that pirates are able to take risks that larger corporations may not be able to. This is especially true with the pirate radio scene in London due to lower overheads than the major stations. These risks pay off as the most popular ones are the most experimental.

Speaking about the Hollywood movie industry, which is now the second largest producer of films in the world.

“The movie industry was founded by pirates who didn’t want to pay a license fee to make films. They fled New York and set up a town of pirate movie makers that is now known as Hollywood”.

Mason does not believe that there should be a world without copyright but thinks that they are useful but they’re outdated they need to be updated to the way we use information in the 21st century. Information has moved from a one way stream to a two way flow and modern copyright laws need to take this into account.

__http://blip.tv/file/3436435/__
__http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OE5QsT5tJWs&feature=player_embedded__
__http://thepiratesdilemma.com/about-author__

__http://www.unesco.org/bpi/eng/unescopress/2000/00-120e.shtml__